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Regulating the cumulative impacts of groundwater withdrawals: Australia and further afield.

The National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training and International Association of Hydrogeologists  are pleased to have Dr. Rebecca Nelson as the 2016 NCGRT / IAH Distinguished Lecturer.

Dr Rebecca Nelson is a Fellow (Non-Resident) of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and a Senior Fellow of the Melbourne Law School, where she teaches water law.

Dr Rebecca Nelson is a Fellow (Non-Resident) of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and a Senior Fellow of the Melbourne Law School, where she teaches water law.

Dr. Nelson will tour every state and territory in Australia to deliver her lecture entitled: Regulating the cumulative impacts of groundwater withdrawals: Australia and further afield.

Abstract: The regulation of groundwater extraction has shifted dramatically through an intense era of intense water reforms spanning three decades. A key outstanding issue is controlling withdrawals with an eye to their cumulative impacts on groundwater resources and dependent systems. Such control is complicated not just by the incremental additive effects of many small withdrawals, but also by interactive and synergistic effects. This complexity is intensified further by data paucity, potentially significant time lags, and simultaneous background changes to natural systems, such as those caused by climate change.

Read the full abstract here.

AUSTRALIAN DATES:
Melbourne: 18 October
Hobart: 20 October
Perth: 26 October
Townsville: 2 November
Brisbane: 3 November
Canberra: 10 November
Sydney: 10 November
Adelaide: 30 November
Darwin: 1 December

Click here to register via the NGCRT website.

Dr Wilson’s biography is available here.

One response to “Regulating the cumulative impacts of groundwater withdrawals: Australia and further afield.”

  1. Andres Jaramillo says:

    Great presentation yesterday at JCU Townsville, interesting comparisions between USA and AU, wondering if the lessons to be learned from our closer neighbor, New Zealand have been also investigated. Their National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management and how it is administered by the different Regional Councils there is a case worth studying and learning from.

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