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Fresh Science nominations – one week to go

Do you know any early-career researchers who have peer-reviewed results, a discovery, or an invention that has received little or no media attention?

Please nominate them for Fresh Science, our national competition that helps early-career researchers find, and then share, their stories of discovery.

Scientists get a day of media training and the chance to share their work with the media, general public and school students.

Fresh Science is looking for:

  • early-career researchers (from honours students to no more than five years post-PhD)
  • a peer-reviewed discovery that has had little or no media coverage
  • some ability to present ideas in everyday English.

How to nominate

Check out the selection criteria, read ahead and see what questions will be asked, then go online and nominate via the short, easy, online application form.  Nominations close midnight on Tuesday 24 April.

The training and events will be held in June and July– the dates are on the website.

What’s involved in Fresh Science?

In each state, we will select the top ten applicants. If selected, you will get:

  • A day of media training where you will: hear from working journalists about what makes science news for them; find the story in your research with guidance from two experienced science communicators; and practice being interviewed in front of camera and on radio.
  • A short profile about your work written in a media-friendly way, published online and via social media.
  • The chance to step on stage and present your science to a friendly audience down at the pub. In some states, you will also present to school students or a “Shark-Tank” style panel of leaders from industry and government.

One story per state will be written up as a press release and issued to the media.

Fresh Science is an initiative of Science in Public.

Fresh Science South Australia is supported by the South Australian Museum, Flinders University, the University of South Australia and the University of Adelaide.

Fresh Science Western Australia is supported by the Western Australian Museum, Edith Cowan University, the University of Western Australia, Curtin University and Murdoch University.

Fresh Science Victoria is supported by the Royal Society of Victoria, The University of Melbourne, Monash University, Deakin University, RMIT University, CSIRO, and La Trobe University.

Fresh Science NSW is supported by the Australian Museum.

Fresh Science Queensland is delivered in partnership with Econnect Communication and is supported by the Queensland Government, QUT, Griffith University, and the University of Queensland.

Now in its 21st year, Fresh Science has trained over 500 scientists to share their science, and generated hundreds of news stories via TV, print, radio and online. You can read past Fresh Scientists’ stories online at freshscience.org.au.

We’re looking for partners around the country for Fresh Science 2018 to help us celebrate our 21st birthday in style. If you’d like to support Fresh Science, please get in touch.

Read more online at www.freshscience.org.au

The future of fuel; food and health—$160 million for four new CRCs

Assistant Minister Assistant Minister for Science, Jobs and Innovation, Senator Zed Seselja

The Assistant Minister for Science, Jobs and Innovation, Zed Seselja has been busy handing out over $165 million to four new Cooperative Research Centres.

They are:

The Digital Health CRC, which received $55m, bringing their total funding to over $200m. The Digital Health CRC is seeking to improve health outcomes for Australians through the use of digital technologies which can improve access to the right health care, lower costs and increase understanding and awareness. The CRC is also examining better ways to share information on adverse reactions and developing better decision support apps. More on their website, or read the media alert.

The MinEx CRC, which received $50m in federal funding, plus $165m in cash and kind from partners. They’ll work on new technologies to increase opportunities for mineral discovery. Creating more productive, economical, safer and environmentally friendly methods to discover and drill out deposits.

The Fight Food Waste CRC received $30m in government funding, plus over $100m from their partners. They will support industry-led collaborations between researchers, industry and the community to address the issue of food waste and help the Government to fulfil its National Food Waste Strategy commitment to halve food waste in Australia.

The Future Fuels CRC received $26.25m, with a further $64.6m of cash and in-kind funding from CRC participants. They will undertake research and development to provide more options to Australian consumers for low-carbon energy at competitive prices. The research will look at opportunities to adapt existing infrastructure for the production, transport and storage of sustainable future fuels such as hydrogen and biogas.

Follow this link for more.

AIG News 131 is available now!

The latest edition of AIG News, the Australian Institute of Geoscientists member newsletter is now available in full colour and digital format and best of all FREE for all readers!

Now all AIG Members and Non Members can enjoy our FREE AIG Newsletter in digital format, including all previous editions. Please click here to see our archive of AIG News.

 

Download the latest copy of AIG News 131 below:

PDF For web: AIG News 131: Download as Single Pages PDF
PDF For web: AIG News 131: Download as Double Page Spread PDF
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For print: AIG News 131: Download as Single Pages PDF
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For print: AIG News 131: Download as Double Page Spread PDF

 

 

Inside this latest issue…

aig_news_131From Your President; Institute News; Membership Updates; Registered Professional Geoscientists Applications; Did intra-oceanic subduction shape the assembly of Cordilleran North America? Evidence from porphyry copper deposits and comparison with the Andes; AEGC; Employment recovery kicks in!; Student report: Spatial and temporal relationships in rocks of the Leeuwin Complex, and their setting within the Pinjarra Orogen of Western Australia; Student report: Structural and lithogeochemical characterization of the depot domain, East Yilgarn – A study in gold prospectivity; AIG Victoria Fosterville Mine; National Graduate Group in QLD; Highlighting the Importance of Earth Sciences in our Schools; The Results of the Professional Issues Subcommittee Survey of Members; Smart Use of Smart Technology and Data; Teacher Earth Science Education Programme (TESEP) – Rock Kit for Schools: Progress Report; AIG Council & AIG News; Events Calendar; And much more…

 

AIG News is optimised to be read with Adobe Reader. Versions are available for printing (with Adobe Reader version 4.1.3 or later) or either reading on-line or downloading for reading off-line with your laptop or tablet (with Adobe Reader version 6.1.5 or later). Both versions have been tested and are compatible with Apple Preview and iBooks for Mac and iPad users.

If you experience any difficulty accessing and reading AIG News using the Adobe Reader versions listed here technical support is available.

We hope that you enjoy the latest AIG News and welcome your feedback.

 

 

Travel Grant to the EGU for Alison Kelsey

Alison Kelsey, PhD graduate of the University of Qld School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, was awarded a $3000 travel grant by the Australian Environmental Foundation.  

The grant enabled Alison to present her work in a paper at the recent European Geophysical Union conference, in Vienna, during April 2018.

The AEF Board has awarded the grant from its Bob Carter Memorial Fund, a fund set up to commemorate the life and work of the late Professor Bob Carter, a world-renowned geologist and marine scientist who passed away in January 2016.

Alison’s PhD thesis  investigated and demonstrated an astronomical mechanism as the cause of cycles of natural climate change of around 1,500 years in length. Her research was based on an analysis of the palaeoclimatic record of Fraser Island in Queensland and other Australian regional records.   The memorial association with Bob Carter’s work is apt; Bob was variously Chairman of an Australian Research Grants panel and Chairman of the Department of Earth Sciences at James Cook University from  from 1998 to 2005 and a visiting research professor in geology and geophysics at the University of Adelaide from 2001 to 2005.  Bob was well known as a “climate contrarian” who in the fullness of time will be proven right, wrong, or some position in-between.  He debated marine geology and climate issues in public with courtesy and objectivity – he would be advising the same approach by Alison Kelsey and all recent graduates.

A Call for Papers by the EGU for a special session on natural cycles in climate change brought about 12 papers on the subject (cycles from decadal to multi-millennial) of which Alison’s contribution is but one.

Michael Asten
Associate Editor for Education Matters, Preview, Australian Society of Exploration Geophysicists

MCA Australian Minerals Education Summit

The MCA Minerals Industry Education Summit will bring together thought leaders from industry, academia and government to consider the future minerals workforce and what changes to the skill and education landscape are required to deliver job-ready professionals to the world class Australian mining industry.

Registration and program details are available from the summit web site.  Contact the MCA for information regarding the summit.