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Geoscientist careers in insurance

Have you thought about how geoscience can contribute to assessment of exposure to catastrophic loss from natural disasters? Ever considered this as a career option?

Aon, an international insurance company has opportunities for geoscientists interested in applying their skills to natural hazard risk assessment and other risk analysis fields where geoscience can have a significant impact.

Aon are looking for geoscientists to work as Analytics Client Managers where you would:

  • Use your technical skills to build a career in the world of reinsurance & risk-based analytics 
  • Join the world’s and Asia’s largest reinsurance brokerage in Sydney or Melbourne 
  • Be trained and mentored by people with similar academic backgrounds 

The opportunity

Join Aon’s successful and expanding operation in either Sydney or Melbourne as an Analytics Client Manager. The position is responsible for delivering analysis of clients’ exposure to catastrophic loss from natural disasters, for analysing pricing for risk transfer mechanisms developed to mitigate those exposures, and for communicating the results of our analysis to clients and reinsurers. You will be required to: 

  • Oversee analysis of client data through use of catastrophe models 
  • Work with team members in developing client specific realistic disaster scenarios including potential impact of climate change 
  • Be able to advise clients on all aspects related to exposure management to improve their catastrophe risk analysis capabilities. 
  • Effectively manage client and other stakeholder engagements and communicate results to these stakeholders using written reports and/or presentations 
  • Conduct training sessions for junior/graduate staff, ensuring the effective and efficient communication of concepts, practical implementation and delivery of results 
  • Provide mentoring for younger members of the team 

About you

You’re comfortable working in a fast paced and dynamic environment and you’re ready to a step into a role that combines technical work and client interaction. If you have exposure to insurance or reinsurance, it would be welcomed but it is not required. To be successful you will have: 

  • Demonstrable experience in using relevant tools to measure exposure to catastrophic loss, including a working knowledge of the science behind the natural events (cyclones, bushfires, storms, floods, earthquakes, etc.) causing loss. 
  • Understand the theory and practicalities of stochastic modelling with advanced Excel and SQL skills and strong working knowledge of MS Word and presentation software such as PowerPoint 
  • Excellent personal skills in engaging with clients, building rapport and managing professional relationships 
  • Strong problem solving and analytical skills with the ability to work well within a team and under pressure 
  • The self-discipline to manage own workflow and deadlines with excellent communication skills (both oral and written) 

Aon are looking to nurture talent from the geosciences sector to bring a diversity of skills to our analytics team, strengthening our client offering. With Aon’s global resources and our commitment to supporting people’s flexible working needs, we are able to mentor and train people from different backgrounds to ensure success. 

Aon Culture and Benefits

At Aon, we provide colleagues with the support to make a positive impact together with ongoing opportunities for development, including the support of a team which will continually inspire you to achieve the best. 

With close to 1600 employees, Aon is the largest organisation of our kind in Australia. Globally, we have an employee base of 50,000 people working across 120 countries. This allows us to gather the best thinking from around the world and deliver solutions locally. We provide colleagues with the support to make an impact, a team that will inspire you to achieve, and on-going opportunities for development. 

Aon is an equal opportunity employer and we invite you to be part of an organisation that has a diverse workplace, values continuous learning and supports many charities and environmental initiatives. 

To find out more details, please contact Alex Kelly bu email or apply here. Some additional information about working for Aon, the company’s health and well being policy and additional information for job seekers, follow the links provided.

Latest Australian geoscientist employment survey open

The latest instalment in AIG’s Australian geoscientist employment survey series is open for contributions. Click here to complete the survey.

This survey will provide data on trends in geoscientist employment in Australia during the first quarter (January, February, March) of 2019.  In the final quarter of 2018 quarter, the Australian geoscientists unemployment rate continued a gradual, downward trend, but increased from 8.3% at the end of September, to 9.1% at the end of December.  Underemployment amongst self-employed geoscientists increased markedly. There is still a general perception that exploration and mining investment is strengthening in Australia, but this may not be flowing through to strongly improved employment prospects for geoscientists.

The survey takes only two or three minutes to complete.  You do not need to be an AIG member to contribute.  No data that could personally identify respondents is collected.  Contributions to the survey are required from both employed and unemployed geoscientists to ensure the relevance of results.  Your completing the survey really helps to make a difference to the standing and knowledge of our profession.

The survey will be open for contributions until 28th April 2019.  Every contribution adds to the reliability of the survey results.  

Sincere thanks in advance for your continued support.

Overall improvement trend in geoscientist unemployment continues, but self-employed geoscientists still doing it tough

Australian Geoscientist employment survey results for Q4 2018 released.

  • Call also made for greater political action to ensure more equitable and timely access to land for exploration
  • More women also forging geoscience careers

The latest quarterly Australian geoscientist unemployment survey for the final quarter of 2018, conducted during January 2019, revealed a slight increasein geoscientist unemployment, from 8.3% at the end of September, to 9.1% at the end of December 2018. Underemployment amongst self-employed geoscientists, however, rose significantly from 12.9% to 18.5% for the same period.

However, despite the dip for the past quarter, the new results pointed to evidence of an overall improving job trend since June 2016.

“This latest quarterly result is disappointing”, Australian Institute of Geoscientists spokesperson, Mr Andrew Waltho said today, “coming at a time when there was genuine optimism regarding an improvement in exploration activity, several, significant new mineral discoveries, and speculation regarding potential skills shortages facing the exploration and mining sectors”.  

Geoscientist employment in Australia June 2009 – December 2018

“Both the Federal Government and Opposition have announced initiatives to support mineral exploration research if elected in the May Federal election, but no-one is talking about improving processes facilitating equitable and timely access to land for exploration,” Mr Waltho said. 

“In fairness, this is a state issue, but we are still seeing bureaucratic and lengthy processes in operation that disadvantage the junior exploration sector in particular, with little sign of change,” Mr Waltho said.

The unemployment and underemployment situation varied widely between states.  Unemployment was lowest in South Australia (5.3%), NSW and ACT (5.6%) and Victoria (5.9%), followed by Western Australia (8.3%).  The results for Victoria and South Australia represent marked improvements on the previous, September quarter survey.  Unemployment in Western Australia was 8.3%, up from 6.5%. Unemployment in Queensland jumped from 11.5% in the September quarter to 15.1% in this survey.

Employment state by state. Too few survey responses were received from South Australia and the Northern Territory for inclusion.

All states except South Australia saw little change or an increase in unemployment in the 12 months between December 2017 and December 2018, but an overall improving trend since June 2016 remains evident.

The underemployment rate in South Australia took some gloss off the positive unemployment figure, coming in at 36.8% for the quarter, followed by Queensland (24.2%), NSW/ACT (16.9%), Western Australia (14.9%) and Victoria (11.8%).  

The survey attracted 391 individual responses.  Too few responses were received from Tasmania and the Northern Territory for the reporting of state results.

Junior exploration and mining companies employ 29% of Australia’s geoscientists according to this survey, almost as many as major and mid-tier companies combined.  

Cultural shift needed

“This amply demonstrates the importance of measures to help small employers avoid burning precious capital waiting for approvals before conducting productive exploration activities” Mr Waltho said.  

“Small companies have a limited capital base on which is difficult to raise further funds and must be used productively if they are to survive,” Mr Waltho said.

“Early career geoscientists tend to be employed in greater numbers by major mining and exploration companies but this soon changes as geoscientists gain professional experience, suggesting that major companies need to look more closely at retaining talent by providing a more dynamic and professionally rewarding professional environment for their staff,” Mr Waltho said.

Sources of employment for Australian geoscientists
Geoscientist employment in mineral exploration, by company tier

Women are represented almost equally in the geoscience staff of major, mid-tier and junior exploration companies.  The overall proportion of women in the workforce remains low, but large, mid-sized and junior companies don’t appear to either discriminate or be preferred sources of employment.

“Gender diversity in exploration and mining, long-considered to be a male dominated profession in Australia is changing rapidly” Mr Waltho said. “Almost half of the early career geoscientists (0-5 years’ experience) who responded to this latest survey were women,” Mr Waltho said.  “The sector is clearly creating career opportunities for women that are being taken up and we need to ensure that this trend continues through measures to promote and preserve gender diversity,” he said.

 “A drop in the proportion of women in the 5 – 10 year experience range is evident, but the proportion of women in the profession increases again in the 10 – 15 year range, suggesting, perhaps, that we are seeing the benefit of measures such as flexible employment and favourable parental leave provisions that enable geoscientists to mix raising a family with pursuit of a career. “This again, is something we need to build,” Mr Waltho said.  

Gender diversity amongst survey respondents. Women comprised 45% of early career geoscientists responding to the survey – signs of a very welcome trend towards more women taking up geoscience as their career

“The fact that we are seeing evidence pointing to this is a real positive for both the exploration and mining industry and our profession,” Mr Waltho said.

Employment survey snapshot

The latest AIG Australian Geoscientist Employment Survey for the final quarter of 2018, conducted during January 2019, revealed a slight increase in overall unemployment amongst Australian geoscientists and a spike in underemployment amongst self-employed geoscience professionals.

Geoscientist unemployment and underemployment in Australia June 2009 to December 2018

The unemployment rate rose slightly from 8.3% at the end of September to 9.1% at the end of December 2018, while underemployment for the same period increased significantly from 12.9% to 18.5%.

The unemployment rate was the lowest recorded since March 2013 but points to the geoscientist employment situation in Australia remaining somewhat fragile.

Analysis of the survey data is continuing – watch the AIG web site for a complete analysis of the survey results.

Australian geoscientist employment survey

The latest Australian geoscientist employment survey is open for contributions.  2019 marks the tenth anniversary of this survey series.

2019 marks the tenth anniversary of AIG's Australian Geoscientist Employment Survey series.
2019 marks the tenth anniversary of AIG’s Australian Geoscientist Employment Survey series.

This latest instalment in the survey series will provide data on trends in geoscientist employment in Australia during the final quarter (October, November, December) of 2018. 

In the September quarter, the Australian geoscientists unemployment rate fell slightly to 8.3%, from 8.5% in the June quarter.  This was the lowest level in several years but coincided with a widely held perception that industry activity and employment opportunities had improved significantly.  The period covered by this survey is typically one of the busiest times in the Australian exploration field season, which makes the muted improvement in employment interesting.

Australian geoscientist employment - June 2009 to September 2018.
Australian geoscientist employment – June 2009 to September 2018.

The survey takes only two or three minutes to complete.  You do not need to be an AIG member to contribute.  No data that could personally identify respondents is collected.

Contributions to the survey are required from both employed and unemployed geoscientists to ensure the relevance of results.  Your completing the survey really helps to make a difference to the standing and knowledge of our profession.

The survey will be open for contributions until 1st February 2019, to allow for the summer holiday season in Australia.  Every contribution adds to the reliability of the survey results.

Thanks in advance for your support.

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