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Postdoctoral fellow position at CODES

CODES, at the University of Tasmania, is searching for a Postdoctoral Research Fellow – Geometallurgy / Economic Geology

This position is based at CODES and is part of the Collaborative Research Centre for Optimising Resource Extraction (CRC ORE). This position is in the areas of Geometallurgy, combined with Economic Geology, specifically predictive geometallurgical controls on grade by size.  The appointee will conduct a geometallurgy research program, with the aim to investigate what geological parameters from a range of scales from mineralogy to ore deposit models can contribute to a prediction of which ore types and ore blocks should be tested for grade engineering behaviour.

Full details of the position are available from the University of Tasmania web site.

Applications close 9th December 2018

The latest Australian geoscientist employment survey is open for contributions – one week to go!

The latest instalment in the Australian geoscientist employment survey series, looking at the September quarter (Juy to September) of 2018, is open for contributions until next Saturday (27 October).  Please take two or three minutes to contribute to the survey this week if you haven’t already done so.  

This survey, available here, will provide data on trends in geoscientist employment in Australia during the third quarter (July to October) of 2018.  In the June quarter, the Australian geoscientists unemployment rate fell to 8.5%.   This was the lowest level of unemployment seen in several years and the survey results indicated that some long term unemployed geoscientists were returning to work.


Australian geoscientist unemployment – June 2009 to June 2018.

Every state, except Queensland, experienced a decrease in unemployment during the June quarter.  The unemployment rate in Queensland increased from 11.3% at the end of March to 12.2% at the end of June.  In Western Australia, unemployment fell from 9.4% to 7.9%.  In South Australia, the unemployment rate fell from 11.1% to 10.3%.

The period covered by this survey is typically one of the busiest times in the Australian exploration field season, which will make the results of this survey especially interesting.

The survey takes only two or three minutes to complete.  You do not need to be an AIG member to contribute.  No data that could personally identify respondents is collected.  Contributions to the survey are required from both employed and unemployed geoscientists to ensure the relevance of results.  Your completing the survey really helps to make a difference to the standing and knowledge of our profession.

The survey will be open for contributions until 27th October.  Every contribution adds to the reliability of the survey results.

September quarter Australian geoscientist employment survey open

This survey, available here, will provide data on trends in geoscientist employment in Australia during the third quarter (July to October) of 2018.  In the June quarter, the Australian geoscientists unemployment rate fell to 8.5%.

Australian geoscientist employment and underemployment – Jun 2009 to Jun 2018

This was the lowest level of unemployment seen in several years and the survey results indicated that some long term unemployed geoscientists were returning to work.

Every state, except Queensland, experienced a decrease in unemployment during the June quarter.  The unemployment rate in Queensland increased from 11.3% at the end of March to 12.2% at the end of June.  In Western Australia, unemployment fell from 9.4% to 7.9%.  In South Australia, the unemployment rate fell from 11.1% to 10.3%.

The period covered by this survey is typically one of the busiest times in the Australian exploration field season, which will make the results of this survey especially interesting.

The survey takes only two or three minutes to complete.  You do not need to be an AIG member to contribute.  No data that could personally identify respondents is collected.  Contributions to the survey are required from both employed and unemployed geoscientists to ensure the relevance of results.  Your completing the survey really helps to make a difference to the standing and knowledge of our profession.

The survey will be open for contributions until 26th October.  Every contribution adds to the reliability of the survey results.

Thanks in advance for your support

Employment recovery back on track for Australian geoscientists – but no sign of a boom

The recovery in employment opportunities for Australia’s geoscientists resumed in the June quarter, with the unemployment rate falling to 8.5% from 11.1% in March. 

Australian geoscientist employment and underemployment – Jun 2009 to Jun 2018

A small increase in the underemployment, or skills underutilisation rate was observed, with 12.9% in March coming in at 13.2% in the latest survey.

This survey series experienced continued, strong support from Australian geoscientists with just over 700 responses received from across Australia.  The number of responses increased in every state.

AIG spokesperson Andrew Waltho welcomed the survey results.  “It’s very encouraging to see the recovery in employment conditions evident since March 2016 continuing, even at a very modest rate, pointing to a recovery in mineral and energy resource exploration, development and production in Australia” Mr Waltho said.

“The improvement in the survey results is consistent with what we have been hearing from members – slightly better job prospects but a number of candidates vying for each position”.

“Again, long term unemployment remains a major concern, although the proportion of geoscientists who have been unemployed or seeking additional work fell from almost 70% to under 60% in the three months between March and June” Mr Waltho said.

“It’s great to see this improvement, but it demonstrates the need for professional bodies representing geoscientists to maintain their efforts to provide accessible professional development and networking opportunities so that members can maintain and improve their skills, and maintain contact with their peers”.

Mr Waltho said maintaining such effort would continue to be a key focus for the Institute with the AIG doing whatever it can to ensure that members seeking work are attractive to employers when an opportunity arises.

“We are encouraged by continuing reports that industry activity is still increasing and creating career opportunities for geoscientists, which will hopefully be evident in the September quarter results” Mr Waltho said.

Mineral exploration employment in Australia has been subject to considerable volatility since June 2009, when these surveys commenced, as following chart shows.

Proportion of Australia’s geoscientists employed in mineral exploration

The data clearly show a seasonal influence on employment.  Self-employed geoscientists expect that there will be less work available during the Australian summer, with the combined impact of the northern Australia wet season creating access difficulties and traditional holidays.  It appears, though, that employment volatility has decreased since September 2015, and the improving trend in employment since then is clear.  These are both interpreted to be positive signs.  The proportion of Australian geoscientists working in mineral exploration also demonstrates the importance of the sector, highlighting the need to maintain equitable conditions for access to land and provision of pre-competitive data by governments.

Every state, except Queensland, experienced a decrease in unemployment during the June quarter.  The unemployment rate in Queensland increased from 11.3% at the end of March to 12.2% at the end of June.  In Western Australia, unemployment fell from 9.4% to 7.9%.  In South Australia, the unemployment rate fell from 11.1% to 10.3%.

Dramatic improvement in employment was recorded in New South Wales and Victoria, where the unemployment rates fell from 18.4% to 2.1%, and from 16.7% to 3.0% respectively.

Changes in the underemployment rate were less dramatic.  In western Australia, the rate increased slightly from 10.8% to 11.6%. In South Australia, the rate decreased from 33.3% to 17.2%, and small decreases were recorded in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.

Too few survey responses were received from Northern Territory and Tasmania to report state results.

Geoscientist unemployment and underemployment – state by state

The next survey will be collected from 30thSeptember 2018.

Have you contributed to the latest Australian Geoscientist Employment Survey?

The latest instalment in the Australian Geoscientist Employment Survey series is open for contributions until this Saturday 21st July.  

The latest instalment in this survey series is designed to provide data on trends in geoscientist employment in Australia during the second quarter (April to June) of 2018.

Please contribute to the survey personally, encourage your peers and colleagues to participate and share news of the survey via social media.  We need as many contributions as possible from Australian geoscientists working or seeking work in any sector of our profession.  You do not need to be an AIG member to contribute – we would like to hear from as many geoscientists working or seeking work in Australia as possible.

Please click here to complete the survey.

The data collected by this series of surveys helps AIG to develop a consistently based, robust and reliable view of employment trends affecting our profession.

The first quarter 2018 survey showed the recovery in geoscientist employment evident in the latter half of 2017 had stalled.

The general feeling, however, is that prospects for geoscience employment in Australia, particularly in exploration and mining, should be improving as a result of increased investment across Australia.  How this is translating into jobs will be demonstrated by the survey results.

No data that could personally identify respondents is collected.  Contributions to the survey are required from both employed and unemployed geoscientists to ensure the relevance of results.

Your completing the survey really helps to make a difference to the standing and knowledge of our profession.

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