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AEGC2019 Data to Discovery

Perth will host the 2nd Australasian Exploration Geoscience Conference (AEGC) from Monday 2 to Thursday 5 September 2019 at Crown Perth.

The AEGC is the largest petroleum and mineral geoscience conference in Australasia, and incorporates the West Australian Basin Symposium (WABS) and the ASEG-PESA International Geophysical Conference and Exhibition.

The event will be jointly hosted by the Australian Institute of Geoscientists (AIG)Australian Society of Exploration Geophysicists (ASEG), and Petroleum Exploration Society of Australia (PESA).

The theme for the 2019 conference is “Data to Discovery”. The AEGC technical program committee has a focus on Geology, Geophysics, and Geochemistry and how these are applied in exploration for both Petroleum and Mineral systems in Australasia and the wider Asia-Pacific region. The conference has major sub-themes encompassing but not limited to:

  • New technologies
  • New information from old data
  • Local understanding from regional context
  • Workflows and methods that reduce cost/turnaround on projects
  • Cross disciplinary co-ordination
  • Case studies
  • Interacting and communicating science to the wider community.

A vital component of the 2019 conference will be the inclusion of dedicated streams for Australian basins, discovery techniques, mineral mapping, and remote sensing applications.

On behalf of the AEGC 2019 Organising Committee, we look forward to welcoming you to Perth.  Visit the conference web site for the latest information regarding the conference, accommodation, sponsorship and exhibition opportunities.

John Gorter and Tim Dean
Co-Chairs

Key Dates:

Call for Abstracts Expression of Interest Closes: 31 January 2019 – submit your expression of interest now via the AEGC2019 website.
Early Bird Registration Opens: 1 March 2019
Call for Extended Abstracts Closes: 22 March 2019 
Author Notification: 3 May 2019 or before
Registration Deadline: 31 May 2019

Epithermal Au-Ag and Porphyry Cu-Au Exploration

Lectures and practical, 4-6 December 2018, by Greg Corbett and Stuart Hayward

December 4 & 5, York Club, 99 York St Sydney, lunch, morning and afternoon teas provided. Two days of PowerPoint lectures focus upon mineral exploration for epithermal and porphyry ore deposits derived from Dr Corbett’s 40 years field experience, including earlier short courses provided with the late Terry Leach from the early 1990’s. Exploration and mining examples from over 40 countries are used to delineate the characteristics of different epithermal and porphyry ore types, and controls to mineralisation, using tools such as alteration, structure and breccias. The exploration implications are considered throughout and a final section considers geological features recognised in exploration marginal to ore bodies. Participants will be provided with a current draft to the notes to be published by Springer in 2020.

December 6 – A practical exercise held W B Clarke Geoscience Centre, Londonderry, uses selected diamond drill core referred to in the lectures (above) and a set of teaching specimens to provide hands on training in ore and alteration mineralogy and the use of geological models. It is run by Corbett and Stuart Hayward, who has over 30 years experience in epithermal-porphyry ore deposit exploration and mining. A return bus from the city and lunch provided.

Prices include lunch, morning and afternoon teas and transport to and from Londonderry.

  • Students $150, but if you need assistance contact greg@corbettgeology.com
  • Unemployed geologists $400
  • Employed geologists $1500

Minimum of 20 participants required and limited to a maximum of 40.

The Short course registration form is available via the Corbett Geology web site.

Geoscientist Employment Recovery Slows

Reported significant improvement earlier this year in employment prospects for professionals in Australia’s exploration and mining industry has slowed, according to the latest Australian geoscientist employment survey results collected by the Australian Institute of Geoscientists for the quarter up to the end of June 2017.

During the second quarter of 2017, geoscientist employment across Australia improved marginally ­­­compared to the previous quarter.  AIG’s latest survey indicates that the unemployment rate amongst Australia’s geoscientists, at 30 June 2017, was 11.3%.  The corresponding underemployment rate was 19.0%.  This represents a very welcome but small decrease in unemployment, down from 12.1% at the end of March 2017, offset by an increase in the underemployment rate, from 18.3% to 19.0%, during the quarter.

Geoscientist unemployment and under-employment in Australia June 2009 – June 2017

Decreases in the unemployment rate are now evident in four of the past five surveys.

Australia’s self-employed geoscientists, independent contractors and consultants, continue to face difficult times with only half able to secure one quarter of their desired workload.

The employment situation varies markedly between industry sectors.  The unemployment in mineral and energy resource exploration in this survey was 14.2%, compared to 6.9% in mineral and energy resource mining and production.  The unemployment rate amongst geoscientists working in other fields, such as environmental geoscience, groundwater resource management, engineering geology, education and agriculture, was 4.0%.

Unemployment and underemployment rates varied significantly between states.  Unemployment was highest in Western Australia at 12.3%, the only State in which unemployment was observed to increase.  South Australia recorded the lowest unemployment rate at 4.2% and the greatest improvement in the unemployment rate during the quarter.  Underemployment was lowest in Western Australia, highest in South Australia and worsened in every State except Western Australia and Queensland.

 

Geoscientist unemployment and underemployment by State

 

Changes in state unemployment and underemployment during Q2 2016

Long term unemployment decreased but remains a serious concern, with more than 60% of unemployed and underemployed not confident of returning to work within the next 12 months.  More than 13% of unemployed geoscientists regained employment during the quarter, but this was more than offset by geoscientists losing employment.   Sentiment amongst geoscientists in employment, however, improved, with more than half indicating that they were confident of remaining in employment for the next 12 months or more.

Almost 20% of unemployed and underemployed geoscientists indicated that they were seeking to leave their profession, up 4% from the previous quarter, continuing an increasing trend. 

Some 61% of respondents indicated that they were working, or seeking work in mineral exploration.  14% were working or seeking work in metalliferous mining, and almost 8% of respondents were working or seeking work in energy resource exploration, mining and production.

AIG spokesperson, Mr Andrew Waltho, expressed concerns regarding the slow recovery in employment opportunities for geoscientists in Australia, particularly in mineral exploration.  “While our latest survey clearly shows that employment prospects for geoscientists are slowly improving generally, with four of the past five surveys recording a decrease in the unemployment rate, exploration activity remains low.  “This has serious implications for the sustainability of Australia’s mining industry by threatening the strength of our mineral resource project pipeline.  “Both greenfield and brownfield exploration is essential if discoveries are to be made to replace, let alone expand, the resource base on which miners produce essential minerals on which our society and economy relies” he said.

“There are some very positive signs in the latest survey results,” Mr Waltho said.  “Unemployment is down, albeit slightly, and employment appears to be strong in the non-mining and resources fields, which represent a small but growing sector in Australian geoscience.  “Employment opportunities in mining appear to be improving and while long term unemployment amongst Australian geoscientists remains high, the rate is falling.  “It is also encouraging to see that higher rates of unemployment amongst geoscientists with more than 25 years of experience evident in past surveys have come back to levels closer to those for other experience bands.

“The lack of employment opportunities in exploration, however, highlights a serious and growing problem of insufficient exploration being undertaken to sustain our resource industries,” Mr Waltho said­.  “Geologists and geophysicists are, without doubt, continuously improving exploration technologies and becoming more productive, but this alone won’t make up for a lack of activity – the boots on ground search for new resources.

“Improving access to land, particularly for zero and very low impact exploration activities and addressing areas of sovereign risk that are increasingly being seen by investors as raising the risk profile of exploration, urgently need to be addressed,” Mr Waltho said.  “Addressing these two issues throughout Australia has the potential to make an enormous difference in both employment and the future of Australia’s mining industry”.

2017 Bursary Awards & Victorian Student Travel Grants applications now open

In 2017 the AIG is again offering bursaries to Honours, Postgraduate and Third Year geoscience students.

The 2017 Bursary awards, which have values between A$1000 and A$4000, are funded by the AIG, by the generous sponsorship of individuals and organisations, and by donations from AIG members to the AIG Geoscience Education Foundation. Further information on bursary applications here.

The AIG Victorian State Branch is also offering Student Travel Grants in 2017. More information is available here.

The 2017 Travel Grants have a value of A$1000 and are funded by the volunteer efforts of the Victorian State Branch Committee.

 

 

 

Smart Use of Technology and Data

8 CPD HoursAIG Victoria branch will hold their annual conference on Friday 13 October 2017 on the smart and successful use of innovative technology and data.  The conference will be held at Macedon, a short country drive from Melbourne airport.

This conference provides the opportunity for geoscientists who have made smart discoveries using smart technology to showcase their results.  The conference additionally provides the opportunity for innovative technology companies to showcase their smart products.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry
  • Geological Mapping
  • Drones
  • Drill sampling and analysis
  • Data mining
  • Augmented reality
  • Drilling technology
  • 3D printing
  • Satellite imagery
  • GIS
  • Software

Speaker registration open | Exhibition booths available | Sponsorship packages available

Call for speakers: Four sessions will be held for 12-16 speakers. Presentations are 20 minutes each plus 5 minutes for questions. No abstracts or papers will be required, instead authors are requested to provide a copy of their presentation for the AIG conference web site. Please include a brief biography when submitting your request to present.

Sponsorship & Exhibition Booths: Packages are available. Exhibition booths are restricted to the first 15 applicants. Booths include a table and 2 chairs. Please nominate when registering if you prefer to bring your own banners or require a 1.8 m x 1.0 m poster board.

Click here for more information and/or to register as a speaker.

For further information and to register your interest please contact:
Rodney Boucher
Phone: 0417 506 051
Email: rodney@linex.com.au