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AGCC 2018 – Abstract Submission Now Open

Individuals are invited to submit an abstract for AGCC 2018. The submission form is now open and will be available until the cut-off date of 16 June 2018 on the convention’s official website. 

Please note that individuals will only be permitted to deliver one oral presentation (unless they are a plenary or invited keynote speaker), but they may co-author multiple oral presentations and may give multiple poster presentations. Full details on abstract submission requirements and terms available here.

Registration

Convention registration is now open!

Early bird registration will be available until 7 July 2018.

Registration Fees Released

Registration fees for AGCC 2018 have now been released on the convention’s official website.

Registration fees will cover lunches, morning and afternoon refreshments, one ticket to the Welcome Reception and materials, including the detailed Convention Program and Abstracts.

Member Organisations of the Australian Geoscience Council will receive a discount on full registrations. Please click here to see all registration options.

Connect with the Convention

Participate in the second ever #OzRockStocktake: the annual social media ‘stocktake’ of Australian geology

Join in the fun!

Participate in the second ever #OzRockStocktake: the annual social media ‘stocktake’ of Australian geology

Held during Earth Science Week, 8-14 October 2017

It’s free, and everyone is invited to participate — school kids, university geology students, professional geoscientists, gem collectors, members of the public…and everyone in between!

Significant book prizes to be won!

Last year’s #OzRockStocktake was such a success that we are doing it again!

Please join in the fun during international Earth Science Week (8-14 October 2017) and get involved in the Australian Geoscience Council’s second ever #OzRockStocktake!

#OzRockStocktake is the annual social media ‘stocktake’ of Australian geology.

 

Whether you are a seasoned geoscientist, a school student, a gem collector, a member of the public or anyone else, it’s easy (and free) to participate! Simply…

  • Take a photo of your favourite gem, stone, rock, fossil, outcrop, mountain or other geological feature
  • Post it on any social media outlet (Twitter / Facebook / Instagram / LinkedIn) from 8-14 October, with the hashtag #OzRockStocktake and a description of what it is or where it was taken
  • You are most welcome to post multiple photos — please note that your photos must be originals that have been taken by you or a member of your family
  • Search for #OzRockStocktake on social media to see all posts
  • The best photos posted during Earth Science Week on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn or Instagram — using the #OzRockStocktake hashtag — will win a stunning print copy of Shaping a Nation: A Geology of Australia, edited by Richard Blewett and kindly donated by Geoscience Australia ($75 value each). Four copies will be given away — one to each photo from the four social media sites.

This is a great opportunity to be involved in an innovative social media project that is tracking and recording Australia?s vast geological heritage. Post anything from your favourite precious stone to your favourite geological outcrop or mountain landscape!

We look forward to your involvement… and remember, please upload your photos on social media from 8-14 October!

For more details / updates:
www.agc.org.au
@AUGeosciCouncil on Twitter
AustralianGeoscienceCouncil on Facebook

Celebrate International Geoscientists Day this Sunday (2 April)

From a warmer Russia to a cooler Down Under, geoscientists urged to “hammer keyboards, not rocks” in online party to celebrate global #GeoscientistsDay

The Australian Geoscience Council is planning a ‘Social media street party’ to be held on Geoscientists Day (this Sunday,
2 April) to celebrate geoscientists and their contribution to society; engage the Australian public in this fascinating field of science; and promote geoscience as a fulfilling career path.

Also aims to connect Australian geoscientists with their international colleagues, to share the importance of their work and discoveries to the world we live in.

Geoscientists Day (originally Geologists Day) originated in Russia to mark the resumption of geological fieldwork after the long, cold winter. In Australia, it also marks the resumption of fieldwork — paradoxically, following our long, hot summer.

Follows success of the Australian Geoscience Council’s inaugural #OzRockStocktake, held last year, in boosting awareness of earth science
via social media.

Simple steps to get involved:

As a geoscientist, use the hashtag #GeoscientistsDay to post on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn your exciting geoscience research / work or a ‘selfie’ at an inspiring geological location or your real-life geological workplace.

As a member of the public, post questions for geoscientists or follow the conversations using the hashtag #GeoscientistsDay. Questions can cover anything geoscience related — from finding out about geoscience as a career to learning about a fossil or rock you’ve found — or bigger questions about geoscience and this exciting multi-faceted field of science.

Australia’s peak body for more than 8000 geoscientists is urging the geoscience community, both in Australia and globally, to “hammer keyboards, not rocks” this Sunday as part of an innovative ‘social media street party’ to celebrate international Geoscientists Day (Sunday 2 April).

“Our virtual #GeoscientistsDay party aims to connect all Aussies, from seniors to students, with the geoscience community via social media to talk anything and everything geoscience or earth science related” said the President of the Australian Geoscience Council (AGC), Dr Bill Shaw.

“We hope to highlight exciting research and developments in geoscience; celebrate the contribution of geoscience to society; and boost the profile of geoscience as an inspiring career path at a time when this major scientific discipline can offer so much to the world and a positive future.

“And as well as connecting geoscientists with the Australian public, we also hope our #GeoscientistsDay social media party will connect Australian geoscientists and their international colleagues to celebrate and share their groundbreaking research and work.

“Geoscientists play an immensely critical role in society as we face the big challenges of our time.

“They are right at the centre of efforts to sustain and advance our way of life, including by meeting the growing demand for the mineral resources that are used in everything from hospitals to smartphones, as well as mainstream energy production.

“They are also at the centre of efforts to ensure groundwater is safe and food production is secure; conduct research to better understand climate change; and help to develop a cleaner energy future.

“They ensure the tunnels you travel through and buildings you work in are not in geological danger zones; and they help to predict and manage geohazards like landslides, earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis.

“Given the very significant role that geoscience will continue to play in our world into the future, it is critical that organisations like ours highlight the rewarding nature of a career in this compelling field of science.

“We hope that #GeoscientistsDay will harness the power of social media to create interesting and enticing conversations about geoscience, and emphasise the crucial role of this major field of science to society.”

Geoscientists Day celebrations began in the USSR in the mid-1960s at the start of summer, a time when fieldwork can be undertaken after the long, cold northern winter. The first Sunday in April is celebrated as Geoscientists Day to recognise geoscientists around the world and their contributions to society. In Australia, April marks the start of the fieldwork season for many exploration geologists — paradoxically because it signals the end of the long, hot summer. As the wet season is finishing in Northern Australia and extreme high temperatures diminish across the Red Centre, many Australian geoscientists are getting ready to roll back into the field for geophysical studies, geochemical sampling and drilling programmes. We wish them luck in their endeavours in supporting Australia as a world-leader in resource development!

Australian Geoscience Council – President’s Report

Current AGC President and former AIG President, Bill Shaw

Current AGC President and former AIG President, Bill Shaw

The AGC has continued to be very active in advocating geoscience in Australia throughout 2016.

A brief summary of our recent achievements follows before some exciting news about our AGC Convention to engage with all geoscientists in Australia and our Region. But first our activities:

We provided a submission to the National Review Of Research Infrastructure and also promoted the views of AuScope, UNCOVER and the Australian Academy of Science National Committee of Earth Sciences, which also made submissions.

We are supporting the Geological Society of Australia (GSA) initiative on Geotourism with a matching contribution of funds for an economic feasibility study on the Warrumbungle UNESCO Global Geopark proposal. This will be a benchmark study and will provide a template for proposals for other Geotourism projects in Australia. We see Geotourism as an important way for the community to engage with their local rocks, and potentially a way of creating opportunities for geoscientists. The GSA’s information is at http://bit.ly/Geotourism. Incidentally there was a successful ‘geo-cultural’ tour recently of Sydney’s iconic (and aptly named) Rocks District.

The AGC has been attending meetings to help develop the Decadal Plan for Earth Sciences in Australia. We see this primarily as a value proposition document to promote future benefits from investment in geoscience. By focusing on the Education and Advocacy sections of this document we consider it will promote the importance of Geoscience and the knowledge we derive from rocks as part of an integrated Earth Sciences strategy.

The AGC Strategic Plan was presented at the 35th International Geoscience Congress in Cape Town, South Africa in August. This provided an opportunity to engage with other like-minded organisations around the world and start to understand how we can all interact, support various initiatives, and learn from our shared successes. The presentation that I gave is available here.

We developed a Media Blitz for this year’s Earth Science Week in October with three main themes. The first was #OzRockStocktake, the photographic outreach event which many of you participated in. Results were very pleasing and can be found by using the hashtag to search Google, Facebook and/or Twitter. We also unveiled a new addition to the National Rock Garden in Canberra, being a piece of Moruya granite from the quarry that provided the dimension stone for the Sydney Harbour Bridge pylons. And finally, we urged our Federal and State Governments to support the UNCOVER initiative to find the ‘next generation’ of hidden mineral deposits in Australia, as these will sustain Australia’s high level of economic prosperity and resource security. These three media releases achieved considerable penetration into Government at all levels. They can be found on the AGC web site.

We have provided some support to the programs developed by Ms Suzy Urbaniak of Kent Street Senior High School and we are pleased to note here that she was awarded the 2016 Prime Minister’s Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools. I congratulated Suzy formally by letter (and informally of course). We know she is a great resource for others who want to emulate her successful engagement of students and the community.

Join in #OzRockStocktake: first photographic census of Australian Geology

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Rock fans to school kids urged to join in #OzRockStocktake: first photographic census of Australian geology Innovative social media project held during international Earth Science Week to showcase Australia?s real rock stars

Getting involved is simple and fun:

  • Take a pic of your favourite rock, outcrop, mountain or other geological feature
  • Post it on Twitter and/or Facebook with the hashtag #OzRockStocktake
  • Search for #OzRockStocktake on social media (be sure to select ?All? or ?Live? tweets or posts) 

Australians of all ages have the opportunity to join in an innovative social media project to record and promote Australia?s vast geological heritage.

The Australian Geoscience Council?s (AGC) #OzRockStocktake is being launched as part of Earth Science Week, which starts this Sunday 9 October and runs until Saturday 15 October.

Earth Science Week is an international event, held each year.  This year?s theme is ?Our Shared Geoheritage?.
“During Earth Science Week — and beyond — Australians are being urged to post a photo on Facebook and/or Twitter of their favourite rocks, outcrops, mountains or geological landscapes, with the hashtag #OzRockStocktake and a short description of where the photo was taken” AGC President, Dr Bill Shaw, said.

“We would also love to see photos posted of stone-based monuments, structures with stone features (like the Sydney Harbour Bridge), stone buildings, iconic geological sites like The Three Sisters in the Blue Mountains, dinosaur bones, other fossils and even meteorites. These all show our vast geological heritage and our fascination with the rocks that are the foundation of everything we are and do.

“We encourage everyone to get involved in this ultimate Aussie rock tour and geological census, whether it be posting a photo online or even just visiting the #OzRockStocktake pages to see what?s there.

“Through the power of social media, we hope to capture a significant collection of images that show the magnitude of our geological heritage, and the many areas of Australia in which it is found.

“It is entirely possible that some of the posts in the #OzRockStocktake might even uncover new geological features or geoheritage sites that we never knew existed, or have forgotten.

“Quite apart from informing us of unique geological features across Australia, we also want this project to demonstrate the many ways in which geoscience and geoscientists contribute to society.

“For example, our mountain ranges, rocks and soil-types determine where our water comes from, how successful particular agricultural exploits will be, our huge natural resources that underpin the high standard of living we enjoy in Australia, and our unique landscape.

Australia’s geoscientists who work across many fields.  While their work in the resources sector exploring for minerals and energy resources may be the first thigs that come to mind,  geoscientists also contribute in many other areas, like ensuring our GPS navigation systems align with the continuing movement of our continent, earthquake monitoring and tsunami warnings, deep ocean research, soil science for agriculture, investigating sites for major engineering projects, groundwater resource management and integrating data to understand climate change using their unique and deep understanding of our planet’s dynamic, interlinked natural systems.

“Geoscientists understand and monitor geohazards to ensure the tunnels you travel through and buildings you are in have solid geological foundations Dr Shaw said.  They discover and help develop the minerals we all use, including those in your smartphone, bicycle and car, and those that will enable the capture, storage and transmission of sustainable energy resources.

“Geoscience is one of the great four scientific disciplines alongside chemistry, physics and biology, and our geoscientists make a crucial contribution to Australia and to all Australians.”

#OzRockStocktake provides an informative and fun way for everyone to join in this work.

For more information about other Earth Science week activities in Australia visit the Geoscience Australia website.  The Australian Geoscience Council website also has information about specific events.

Information about Earth Science Week globally is available here.  You can also follow @earthsciweek on Twitter or search for the #EarthSciWeek hashtag.

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