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Epithermal Au-Ag and Porphyry Cu-Au Exploration short course

Greg Corbett and Stuart Hayward are presenting their popular epithermal Au-Ag and Porphyry Cu-Au Exploration short course, 14-16 May 2019.

May 14 & 15, Chatswood Club, 11 Help Chatswood, NSW (5 mins walk from Chatswood train station) lunch, morning and afternoon teas provided. Two days of PowerPoint lectures focus upon mineral exploration for epithermal and porphyry ore deposits derived from Dr Corbett’s 40 years field experience, including earlier short courses provided with the late Terry Leach from the early 1990’s. Exploration and mining examples from over 40 countries are used to delineate the characteristics of different epithermal and porphyry ore types, and controls to mineralisation, using tools such as alteration, structure and breccias. A final section considers geological features recognised in exploration marginal to ore bodies. Participants will be provided with a current draft of the new short course notes. Drafts of the first few chapters are available here.

May 16 – A practical exercise held at the W B Clarke Geoscience Centre, Londonderry, uses diamond drill core referred to in the lectures (above) and a set of teaching specimens to provide hands on training in ore and alteration mineralogy and the use of geological models. Greg is helped by and Stuart Hayward, who has over 30 years experience in epithermal-porphyry ore deposit exploration and mining. Return bus from Chatswood and lunch provided.

Registration includes handouts, lunch, morning and afternoon teas and transport to and from Londonderry. Minimum of 20 participants required and limited to a maximum of 40.
Students from $150 + GST but if you need assistance contact Greg Corbett
Unemployed geologists from $400 + GST
Employed geologists from $1500 + GST
Follow the link to download the short course registration form.

Geoscientist unemployment essentially unchanged

The latest Australian geoscientist employment survey results show little change in unemployment and underemployment amongst Australian geoscientists in Quarter 3 from Quarter 2, 2018.

Geoscientist unemployment in Australia during the third quarter of 2018 was little changed from the previous quarter.  The unemployment rate fell from 8.5% at the end of June to 8.3% at the end of September.  Under-employment amongst self employed geoscientists also fell slightly, from 13.2% to 12.9% for the same period.

Geoscientist unemployment in Australia June 2009 to September 2018
Geoscientist unemployment in Australia June 2009 to September 2018.

Almost half (43%) of respondents reporting that they were under-employed said that they were achieving less than 25% of their desired level of self- employment, pointing to real unemployment and under-employment rates of 13.8% and 7.4% for the September quarter of 2018 respectively.

The survey results are interpreted to reflect anecdotal evidence of continued improvement in geoscientist employment in Australia throughout 2018, but the pace of improvement has been slow. 

“Employment conditions for geoscientists in Australia are showing very welcome, gradual employment but the rate at which this improvement is happening remains slow” AIG spokesperson Andrew Waltho said.  

State by state, unemployment fell in Western Australia and Queensland.  A small increase in unemployment was observed in NSW and the ACT, but significant increases in unemployment were evident in Victoria, where unemployment increased by almost 11%, followed by South Australia at over 9%.

Western Australia and Queensland unemployment June 2009 to Sep 2018
Western Australia and Queensland unemployment June 2009 to Sep 2018

“In the latest survey, 23% of unemployed and underemployed respondents lost employment during the past three months”.  “This was only slightly exceeded by the number of respondents re-entering the workforce” Mr Waltho said.  “A significant number of geoscientists appear to be caught in an employment revolving door” Mr Waltho said.

The proportion of geoscientists employed in mineral exploration during the September quarter increased, from 65.3% to 66.1% during the quarter; the highest contribution proportion of survey respondents engaged in mineral exploration of 66.9% recorded by these surveys in September 2012, suggesting that increased mineral exploration in Australia is making a difference, but at the expense of other fields of practice.  Little change was evident in employment in metalliferous mining and energy resource exploration and production.

The proportion of unemployed and underemployed geoscientists looking to leave their profession fell sharply from 4,2% at the end of June, to 2.6% at the end of September. 

“The decline in geoscientists looking to leave their profession must be seen as a positive sign” Mr Waltho said.  “These results are markedly down from the peak of 11.4% of unemployed and under-employed geoscientists looking to leave their profession recorded in December 2016” Mr Waltho said.

The proportion of geoscientists in full-time employment in the latest survey was 68.6%, well below the peak of 83.9% recorded in June 2014.  Part time employment provided 3.3% of jobs.  Some 28.1% of respondents identified as being self employed; up from 21.9% in the previous quarter and the low of 13.0% recorded in June 2013.  

“We have clearly seen a trend towards engagement of self-employed geoscientists as consultants and contractors by exploration and mining companies over the past four to five years” Mr Waltho said.  “This is reflected in data for employment and unemployment by years of experience, which points to almost half of unemployed geoscientists being the most experienced component of the workforce” Mr Waltho said.  

Geoscientist employment and and unemployment by years of experience.
Geoscientist employment and and unemployment by years of experience.

“Early career geoscientists are also experiencing difficulties getting started in the profession” Mr Waltho said.  “AIG is strongly focused on this issue with AIG’s National Graduate Committee working hard to improve opportunities for early career geoscientists through initiatives that, notably, include the Institute’s extremely successful mentoring programme” Mr Waltho said.

The next survey will open for contributions on 1 January 2019.

Epithermal Au-Ag and Porphyry Cu-Au Exploration

Greg Corbett and Stuart Hayward are presenting their informative and well regarded epithermal Au-Ag and porphyry Cu-Au exploration short course in Sydney this December.

Two days of PowerPoint lectures (December 4 and 5) focus upon mineral exploration for epithermal and porphyry ore deposits derived from Dr Corbett’s 40 years field experience, including earlier short courses provided with the late Terry Leach from the early 1990’s. Exploration and mining examples from over 40 countries are used to delineate the characteristics of different epithermal and porphyry ore types, and controls to mineralisation, using tools such as alteration, structure and breccias. The exploration implications are considered throughout and a final section considers geological features recognised in exploration marginal to ore bodies. Participants will be provided with a current draft to the new short course notes. Drafts of the first few chapters are available here.  The lectures will be held at the York Club, 99 York St Sydney, with lunch, morning and afternoon teas provided. 

A practical exercise will be held W B Clarke Geoscience Centre, Londonderry December 6, using selected diamond drill core referred to in the lectures and a set of teaching specimens to provide hands on training in ore and alteration mineralogy and the use of geological models. It will be run by Corbett and Stuart Hayward, who has over 30 years experience in epithermal-porphyry ore deposit exploration and mining. A return bus from the city and lunch provided.

Prices include lunch, morning and afternoon teas and transport to and from Londonderry.

  • Students $150 + GST, but if you need assistance contact greg@corbettgeology.com
  • Unemployed geologists $400 + GST
  • Employed geologists $1500 + GST

Minimum of 20 participants required and limited to a maximum of 40.  For registration details visit www.corbettgeology.com/services/


AEGC2019 Data to Discovery

Perth will host the 2nd Australasian Exploration Geoscience Conference (AEGC) from Monday 2 to Thursday 5 September 2019 at Crown Perth.

The AEGC is the largest petroleum and mineral geoscience conference in Australasia, and incorporates the West Australian Basin Symposium (WABS) and the ASEG-PESA International Geophysical Conference and Exhibition.

The event will be jointly hosted by the Australian Institute of Geoscientists (AIG)Australian Society of Exploration Geophysicists (ASEG), and Petroleum Exploration Society of Australia (PESA).

The theme for the 2019 conference is “Data to Discovery”. The AEGC technical program committee has a focus on Geology, Geophysics, and Geochemistry and how these are applied in exploration for both Petroleum and Mineral systems in Australasia and the wider Asia-Pacific region. The conference has major sub-themes encompassing but not limited to:

  • New technologies
  • New information from old data
  • Local understanding from regional context
  • Workflows and methods that reduce cost/turnaround on projects
  • Cross disciplinary co-ordination
  • Case studies
  • Interacting and communicating science to the wider community.

A vital component of the 2019 conference will be the inclusion of dedicated streams for Australian basins, discovery techniques, mineral mapping, and remote sensing applications.

On behalf of the AEGC 2019 Organising Committee, we look forward to welcoming you to Perth.  Visit the conference web site for the latest information regarding the conference, accommodation, sponsorship and exhibition opportunities.

John Gorter and Tim Dean
Co-Chairs

Key Dates:

Call for Abstracts Expression of Interest Closes: 31 January 2019 – submit your expression of interest now via the AEGC2019 website.
Early Bird Registration Opens: 1 March 2019
Call for Extended Abstracts Closes: 22 March 2019 
Author Notification: 3 May 2019 or before
Registration Deadline: 31 May 2019

Geochemical halos to Proterozoic sediment-hosted ore deposits

Postdoctoral Research Fellow opportunity at CODES.

CODES, the Centre for Ore Deposit and Earth Sciences formed in 1989 at the University of Tasmania. Over nearly three decades, the Centre has grown substantially and is now regarded widely as a global leader in ore deposit research.

This role is part of a research initiative being funded by the Queensland Government’s Strategic Resources Exploration Program. It is based at CODES, and the successful applicant will undertake geochemical investigations of ores and altered rocks from a variety of sediment-hosted base metal and iron-oxide copper-gold deposits in NW Queensland. The appointee will provide detailed characterisation and interpretations of the distal geochemical footprints to these major base metal resource.

Applications close Monday, 16 July 2018.  Visit the UTas website for more information.

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