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Do you know a geoscientist who deserves recognition as a National Geoscience Champion?

 The Australian Geoscience Council (AGC) is pursuing a Vision to raise the profile of Geoscience to be pre-eminent in Australia and to be recognised as one of the great fields of general science with Physics, Chemistry and Biology. In doing this the AGC is calling for nominations for the next National Geoscience Champion. This honour will be awarded to very few geoscientists. It will recognise major contributions to our science, craft and art, evidenced by technical, leadership, mentoring and collegial endeavours. 

Nominations for National Geoscience Champions should include: 

  • Name and contact details of Nominators 
  • An outline of the nominees geoscientific career 
  • Details of their significant contributions to geoscience in Australia 
  • Details of the impact of their work in geoscience internationally 

Nominations should be concise and not exceed more than 500 words or an A4 page.

Assessment Guidelines 

A panel of at least three AGC members will be involved in the assessment of National Geoscience Champion awards as required. The Panel shall be include the President of the AGC with the Opportunity to co-opt specific panel members to assist and advise as required. 

An award of National Geoscience Champion is not made as an annual event rather there will be up to a maximum of EIGHT National Geoscience Champions at any given time – reflecting the number of membership organisations involved in the AGC. 

Awardees of the National Geoscience Champions do not have to be current members of any of the AGC Member Organisations. The award will be given on merit and not on membership. 

National Geoscience Champions will be asked to participate in events during the years following the award to engage and enthuse geoscientists and to promote geoscience nationally. Where necessary the AGC will provide financial assistance to the National Geoscience Champion to attend these events. 

Nominations should be submitted by email to admin@agc.org.au. Further details the nomination process are available from the AGC website.

AEGC 2019 CALL FOR ABSTRACTS – Open until 22 March 2019

Abstract submissions are welcome for consideration for the AEGC 2019 Conference, to be held on 2-5 September 2019 at Crown Perth. The theme for the 2019 conference is “Data to Discovery”. The AEGC technical program committee has a focus on Geology, Geophysics, and Geochemistry and how these are applied in exploration for both Petroleum and Mineral systems in Australasia and the wider Asia-Pacific region. We invite you to submit your abstract before the closing deadline at 5pm on Friday 22 March (AWST).  

Early Bird Registration will be opening next month, be sure to secure your spot at the early bird rate!

Further information regarding the conference can be found on the AEGC 2019 website.

AEGC2019 Data to Discovery

Perth will host the 2nd Australasian Exploration Geoscience Conference (AEGC) from Monday 2 to Thursday 5 September 2019 at Crown Perth.

The AEGC is the largest petroleum and mineral geoscience conference in Australasia, and incorporates the West Australian Basin Symposium (WABS) and the ASEG-PESA International Geophysical Conference and Exhibition.

The event will be jointly hosted by the Australian Institute of Geoscientists (AIG)Australian Society of Exploration Geophysicists (ASEG), and Petroleum Exploration Society of Australia (PESA).

The theme for the 2019 conference is “Data to Discovery”. The AEGC technical program committee has a focus on Geology, Geophysics, and Geochemistry and how these are applied in exploration for both Petroleum and Mineral systems in Australasia and the wider Asia-Pacific region. The conference has major sub-themes encompassing but not limited to:

  • New technologies
  • New information from old data
  • Local understanding from regional context
  • Workflows and methods that reduce cost/turnaround on projects
  • Cross disciplinary co-ordination
  • Case studies
  • Interacting and communicating science to the wider community.

A vital component of the 2019 conference will be the inclusion of dedicated streams for Australian basins, discovery techniques, mineral mapping, and remote sensing applications.

On behalf of the AEGC 2019 Organising Committee, we look forward to welcoming you to Perth.  Visit the conference web site for the latest information regarding the conference, accommodation, sponsorship and exhibition opportunities.

John Gorter and Tim Dean
Co-Chairs

Key Dates:

Call for Abstracts Expression of Interest Closes: 31 January 2019 – submit your expression of interest now via the AEGC2019 website.
Early Bird Registration Opens: 1 March 2019
Call for Extended Abstracts Closes: 22 March 2019 
Author Notification: 3 May 2019 or before
Registration Deadline: 31 May 2019

What is continued professional development and why is it a good thing?

Graduation from university with an Earth science degree represented a major learning milestone that enabled you to begin your geoscience career.  It also represented the start of the next phase in your professional, technical and personal development through continuing development as a professional.

Continuing professional development, or CPD, is work-related learning that should continue throughout your career.  The year in which new professionals enter the workforce is usually a period of intense, on the job learning in a diverse range of areas such as field and mapping skills, sampling, core logging, managing contractors, landowner liaison and mining title management, to name but a few.  University studies provide an essential and solid grounding in geological principles, Earth systems, scientific method and research skills, which must be supplemented by a broad spectrum of new skills that are based on elements of these fields and represent workplace essentials.

In many professions, CPD forms an integral part of a licence to practice.  More professions require a managed and verifiable commitment to CPD than not.  The dominant reason for this this is the perception of public risk associated with practice of the profession in question.  Medical professionals, for example, may be called on to make decisions that could affect someone’s life.  Engineers design and build structures and machines that could create public safety risks or have profound economic consequence if they fail.  Teachers shape the character and skills of young people who will be the backbone of our society in future years.

Geoscientists have the privilege of being self-regulating.  There is no universal requirement for professional registration and licencing of geoscientists in Australia.  This does not, however, diminish the need for, and value of CPD.  It remains one of the key mechanisms by which high standards of professional practice and the relevance and currency of qualifications and experience are maintained.

CPD is frequently described as an investment for both individuals and employers as it involves maintaining enhancing and extending your knowledge expertise and competence.  It is central to the definition of professionalism recognised by the general public, where professionals strive to become leaders, knowledgeable, sources of advice and able to reliably solve problems in their chosen fields, which sets them apart from the rest of the pack.

Formal CPD falls into three broad categories:

  1. formal CPD;
  2. informal work-related CPD; and
  3. activities external to your work that contribute to your CPD.

CPD requires an investment of time, but the cost of CPD does not need to be onerous due to the range of activities that fall into the three categories above.

Join a discussion of CPD and professionalism on the AIG Linkedin Group.

Australian geoscientists recognised in Queen’s Birthday Honours

A number of prominent Australian geoscientists and minerals sector figures were recognised in the Queen’s Birthday honours announced this week.

Mr Philip Ernest BOCK 
Medal (OAM) in the General Division 
For service to geology, marine biology, and to the community.  Dr Bock has been an Honorary Researcher, Museums Victoria, since 1982,  a Member, International Bryozoology Association (IBA), Editor and Contributor, World Register of Marine Species (WoRMS), and a Member, International Society for Reef Studies.  His career has included recognition of a previously undiscovered barnacle of Genus: Tetraclitella, in a sandstone block at the Melbourne Magistrates’ Courts, 2006.

Mr Paul Robertson ESPIE FAusIMM
Officer (AO) in the General Division
For distinguished service to the mining and infrastructure sectors through financial advisory roles, to public policy development and reform, and to not-for-profit organisations.  Mr Espie is a Director of Aurelia Metals Ltd, and was Chairman, Oxiana Limited, 2000-2003 and Chairman, Cobar Mines Pty Ltd, 1993.

Ms Donna FRATER MAusIMM
Member (AM) in the General Division
For significant service to the mining industry, particularly through the promotion of greater gender diversity in the sector.  Ms Frater was Chair of the Women In Mining Network, 2008-2010 and a Member 2002-2015, involved with the establishment of Women in Mining and Resources Queensland, a former member of the Mining Mentoring Program, and is a co-founder and current member of Women in Mining NSW.  Ms Frater was also Chair of the Minerals COuncil of Australia Gender Diversity Reference Group, 2012-2015.  Her career also included geologist roles with BHP Mitsubishi Alliance (BMA) and Rio Tinto.

Mr Gary Michael JOHNSTON
Public Service Medal 
For outstanding public service through improving national and international scientific program delivery in satellite positioning and geodesy.  Mr Johnston’s leadership in his role as Branch Head, Geodesy and Seismic Monitoring at Geoscience Australia has enabled the improved adoption of satellite Positioning, Navigation and Timing technology across Australian industry, research and government sectors.  Since 2015 he has chaired the International Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Service (IGS). GNSS supports many applications, including precise navigation, machine automation, and surveying and mapping. His key contribution has been to refocus IGS efforts onto societal applications of precise observations of the Earth using GNSS technologies.

Professor Geoffrey Neil PHILLIPS FAIG FAusIMM
Medal (OAM) in the General Division
For service to rogaining, to minerals exploration, and to education.  Professor Phillips is a Director of  Phillipsgold and an Honorary Professorial Fellow, School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne, since 2000.  He was Chief, Division of Exploration and Mining, CSIRO, 2001-2004, General Manager Geology, Great Central Mines Ltd, 1995-1999,  and Chair, Victorian Institute of Earth and Planetary Sciences, 2001-2005 and Member, 1995- 2005.

Ms Erica Lee SMYTH
Companion (AC) in the General Division
For eminent service to the community through corporate governance roles with charitable, medical research, higher education, nuclear scientific and technology organisations, to the minerals exploration sector, and to women in business.  She was Chair of Toro Energy, 2009-2015 and a board member from 2004-2015.  She was also Non-Executive Director, National Energy Resources Australia, since 2015; Non- Executive Director, Deep Exploration Technologies CRC, 2013-2017 and Chair, Advisory Board, National Offshore Petroleum Safety and Environmental Management
Authority, since 2017.  She is also a former Deputy Chair and Director of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation.  Dr Smyth’s career has included Principal Geologist, BHP Minerals Limited, for seven years, Manager, Beenup mineral sands project, BHP-Utah Minerals, for four years, Manager, Gas Market Development WA, BHP Petroleum for two years and General Manager, Corporate Affairs, Woodside Petroleum Limited, 1999-2004.

Congratulations to all award recipients.

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