aig_pagebanner02_Bulga-coal-mine

Inclusion and diversity central to AIG’s strategy

The AIG Council meets once a year, face to face, to consider issues that are central to AIG’s strategy. The 2019 meeting was held in late June in Adelaide.

It was great to meet members of the revitalised South Australia Branch committee. AIG has had an active branch in South Australia for some years, but a new committee has recently taken on the task of revitalising a program of regular branch meetings and seminars in the state. The Central West Exploration Discussion Group (CWEDG) has also recently merged with AIG’s New South Wales Branch to foster opportunities for geoscientists in the Orange region to meet and interact. State Branches play an essential role in the delivery of many of AIG’s benefits of membership and these developments will, without doubt, enhance our Institute’s ability to represent members in those areas.

The first face to face meeting of state branch committee representatives is to be held in Perth in early September, with the aim of improving managing AIG business, the work of our secretariat and, most importantly, improve communications between Council, AIG’s board, branches.

Several priorities emerged from the meeting:

  • AIG will remain a member-run, agile and responsive professional institute with low fees. AIG’s not for profit model is seen to be central to the Institute’s success.
  • Professionalism: we will continue to build a strong commitment to professionalism and ethics.
  • Building a community: we will strive to increase opportunities for members to meet and interact, face to face and on-line. Council is facilitating either audio or video recording of technical talks and other events for the benefit of members across Australia.
  • Retention and growth: we need to look closely at how to retain students as graduate members, and graduates as full members.
  • Education: AIG will remain committed to both secondary and tertiary geoscience education through support of ESWA and TESEP, and AIG’s own, very successful, undergraduate and postgraduate student bursary program.
  • Advocacy: we will look closely at how AIG manages this role, in its own right and in collaboration with kindred societies.
  • Inclusion and diversity: support for members with parental responsibilities and looking at AIG documents, to ensure they use gender-neutral language.

Many of these are issues that won’t be solved overnight, but on which substantial progress can be made in the next twelve months.

Aspects of the inclusion and diversity issue received immediate attention. We want to ensure that all members taking parental leave can retain contact with their peers and involvement in AIG activities. Members are able to request a membership subscription concession for up to three years while they undertake parental duties and are eligible for concessional registration for all AIG events. AIG’s Code of Ethics has also been reviewed to ensure that gender-neutral language is used throughout. The revised Code of Ethics will be put forward for member approval at the annual general meeting next year. This review is continuing. Council has also committed to reviewing recognition of overseas academic qualifications, to ensure that our assessment process is both equitable and robust.

AIG publications and establishment of specialist groups, where members can engage with others on topics of particular interest, are also on the agenda. Watch for further details and take the opportunity to share thoughts and ideas with your local branch or any Councillor – see AIG News for contact details.

Andrew Waltho
President

Have you renewed your AIG Membership for 2017/2018?

 

Renew now to ensure your ongoing AIG Membership!

Have you renewed your AIG Membership for 2017/2018? Please check the outstanding membership renewals list below for your name, if you find yourself on the list please follow the link below to renew your AIG Membership.

See a colleagues name? Please remind them to renew by sharing this document.

Click here to login and renew your membership. If you have any questions in regards to your membership, email us at membership@aig.org.au.

 

 

AIG News 129 is available now!

The latest edition of AIG News, the Australian Institute of Geoscientists member newsletter is now available in full colour and digital format and best of all FREE for all readers!

Now all AIG Members and Non Members can enjoy our FREE AIG Newsletter in digital format, including all previous editions. Please click here to see our archive of AIG News.

 

Download the latest copy of AIG News 129 below:

PDF For web: AIG News 129: Download as Single Pages PDF


PDF For web: AIG News 129: Download as Double Page Spread PDF


PDF For print: AIG News 129: Download as Single Pages PDF


PDF For print: AIG News 129: Download as Double Page Spread PDF

 

 

Inside this latest issue…

aig_news_129From Your President; Institute News; NSW Branch Report; Education News; Membership Updates & Registered Professional Geoscientists Applications; Geoscientist Employment Recovery Slows; Gypsum Dehydration: The Interplay between Nanoporosity Formation, Dehydration and Phase Transformation; What’s Happening with Mineral Exploration in Australia?; What Changed Ancient Climates?; INTRAW: Update & Observatory Launch; Inclusion and Diversity in Australian Geoscience; Drilling for Geology II; Biogeochemistry Seminar & Golden Lucky Draw; You can’t beat a Career in Geoscience; AIG Mentoring News – Our Third and Biggest Program Successfully Kicks-Off; Are you Interested in Geotourism?; Events Calendar; AIG Council & AIG News and much more…

 

AIG News is optimised to be read with Adobe Reader. Versions are available for printing (with Adobe Reader version 4.1.3 or later) or either reading on-line or downloading for reading off-line with your laptop or tablet (with Adobe Reader version 6.1.5 or later). Both versions have been tested and are compatible with Apple Preview and iBooks for Mac and iPad users.

If you experience any difficulty accessing and reading AIG News using the Adobe Reader versions listed here technical support is available.

We hope that you enjoy the latest AIG News and welcome your feedback.

 

2017 Member Advantage Satisfaction Survey

 

Member Advantage is again running its annual Satisfaction Survey. AIG Members have been invited to participate in the survey.

Member Advantage invites you to complete the Member Advantage 2017 Satisfaction Survey and go into the draw to win one of two AU$250 Wish Gift Cards.

This survey is conducted annually to collect important feedback about usage and your experiences with the Member Advantage program. The survey should take no more than 10 minutes to complete and will provide us with valuable insights so we can continue to add additional value to your benefits program.

Once you have completed the survey, please enter your details to go in the draw to win one of two AU$250 Wish gift cards. The survey closes on Friday 23rd June 2017 at 17:00 (AEST).

Complete the survey at http://www.member-advantage.com/survey

 

Your response is private and confidential – responses will not be identified by individual and will be compiled together and analysed as a group. *View the competition terms & conditions.

The survey closes on Friday 23rd June 2017 at 17:00 (AEST).

 

 

AIG Professional Issues Subcommittee – Upcoming Member Survey

The AIG Professionals Subcommittee is a subcommittee of Council comprising:

  • Wayne Spilsbury MAIG, FAusIMM (CP), PGeo
  • Dr Julian Vearncombe BSc. PhD. FGS. FSEG. FAIG. RPGeo.
  • Kaylene Camuti   MAIG, RPGeo
  • Josh Leigh MAIG
  • Dr Robert Findlay MAIG

AIG’s vision statement is “The AIG will strive to be the preeminent Australian professional institute in advocacy for, and public promotion of, all Australian geoscientists”. This is not a static statement. As the practice of geoscience evolves with changes in technology and changes in society’s expectations of professional practice, so must AIG change to preserve its preeminent status.

Benchmarking against the major international geoscience professional institutes shows AIG may be falling behind in its entrance requirements, expectations of Continued Professional Development (CPD) by members and governance.

The Professional Issues Subcommittee was formed at the Face to Face Strategic Planning meeting in June 2016.  Its mandate was to create a “Road Map” to improve competency and increase professionalism (and the community perception of professionalism) of AIG members. The Subcommittee’s Charter is summarised in Figure 1.

Figure 1. AIG Professional Issues Subcommittee Charter and Objectives

A PDF copy of Figure 1 (above) is available here.

AIG members will soon receive a link to an on-line survey prepared by the Professional Issues Subcommittee.  We are seeking your input as we prepare the Road Map for presentation to the AIG Council.  Your responses will assist the subcommittee in its recommendations to Council for AIG to demonstrate best practice.

The survey is seeking your input on the following issues:

Membership Requirements – Education and Communication Skills

The current minimum requirements for AIG Membership are a 3 year bachelor’s degree in the geological sciences and five years relevant professional experience that includes two years in which the applicant has been required to exercise professional judgement and discretion, and is supported by at least two AIG members with personal knowledge of the applicant’s relevant professional experience.

For industry employers, an Honours degree is the desired minimum qualification for graduate employment.  This is because, under the modern degree system, most students are not exposed to work requiring problem solving and the exercise of technical and professional judgement until their Honours year.  That is, until students complete Honours, they have little to no experience in the acquisition, assessment, compilation and interpretation of data, and little experience in technical writing and professional reporting.

Some institutions require applicants to submit a recent report and undertake a personal interview to demonstrate their functional literacy skills.

In many comparable jurisdictions (Canada, USA, South Africa and Europe) the minimum education requirement for professional institute admission is a 4 year Bachelor’s degree. AIG is currently not, but could potentially be at risk of losing its Recognised Overseas Professional Organisations (ROPO) status which allows our Members to identify as Qualified Persons or Competent Persons in these jurisdictions because of our lesser education requirement[1].

Should the education requirement be changed to an Honours degree or equivalent and should new applicants be interviewed and be required to submit a recent report (or other example of written, geoscientific work)?

Membership Requirements – Law and Ethics Examination

Some professional organisations require applicants to complete a professional Law and Ethics short course, and pass an examination. The short courses are designed to increase knowledge of corporate law, stock exchange rules and other relevant legislation, and teach the obligations and responsibilities that come with adherence to a Code of Ethics. Typically these Law and Ethics short courses involve a seminar followed by an on-line exam.

Membership Requirements – Continuous Professional Development (CPD)

AIG promotes the benefits of CPD to all members and requires Registered Professional Geoscientists to complete and document a minimum of 50 hours of CPD, on average, annually over a three year period.  CPD is not a guarantee of competence.  The community at large, however, sees a commitment to CPD as being at the core of an individual being able to describe themselves as a “professional”.  Should AIG follow many professional organisations in other disciplines to make undertaking and recording CPD activities a requirement of membership?

Authoring Reports

Because geoscience is largely unregulated in Australia, essentially anyone can submit a geoscientific report to an employer, client, the public at large, or a government authority.  This arguably undermines the practice of professional geoscientists and exposes the public to risks inherent in the misrepresentation and misinterpretation of geoscientific data and observations, not just confined to exploration results and mineral resource reporting.   Should Members be encouraged to sign and seal all formal public documents that have been created by them in their professional capacity to employers, clients and the public? Should AIG promote the benefits of only accepting geoscientific reports prepared by members of a professional institute including AIG and AusIMM in Australia, or a Recognised Overseas Professional Organisation?

JORC Competent Person

The JORC Code defines a ‘Competent Person’ as “… a minerals industry professional who is a Member or Fellow of The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, or of the Australian Institute of Geoscientists, or of a ‘Recognised Overseas Professional Organisation’ … and … must have a minimum of five years relevant experience in the style of mineralisation or type of deposit under consideration and in the activity which that person is undertaking.” (JORC 2012)  The key qualifier in the definition of a Competent Person are the words ‘relevant experience’.  What  constitutes relevant experience is left to the judgement of the Competent Person (CP) who must be confident of being able to demonstrate competence to a panel of their peers if called on to do so (convened by the AIG or AusIMM Complaints or Ethics and Standards committees)

Several reviews of JORC reports (AIG JORC Representatives, 2015 and Combes, 2016) have identified frequent shortcomings in:

  • Competent Person reports issued in compliance with the JORC Code that range from procedural breaches (e.g. omitting a consent statement by the CP);
  • provision of inadequate technical information of substance (e.g. cut-off grades and maximum internal dilution in a drill intercept, physical characteristics of industrial minerals); and, less frequently,
  • a lack of market-sensitive technical information (e.g. inadequate, opaque description of mineralisation in “intersections of massive sulphides” without describing the sulphide minerals observed or their respective abundances) which represent a failure to comply with the underlying transparency and materiality provisions of the JORC Code.

Australia, arguably, benefits from a non-prescriptive standard for exploration results, mineral resource and ore reserve information to securities exchanges.  This information, particularly for junior companies, is almost invariably market sensitive, making a high standard of compliance with JORC imperative if JORC is to be preserved, rather than replaced by more prescriptive requirements.  There appears to be a compelling argument that our JORC reporting skills need improvement.

Should the definition of a Competent Person under JORC be changed to require Registered Professional Geoscientist (RPGeo) status (and Chartered Professional status for AusIMM members) to implement a requirement for CPD and a higher standard of independent peer review of the CP’s relevant experience?  A change for Australian geoscientists would bring them into alignment with Canadian geoscientists who already need to be registered with the relevant provincial registration authority (PGeo).  This could be seen to be strengthening the access to reciprocal reporting arrangements to the TSX and TSXV, by far the world’s largest sources of exploration and mining investment capital.

Licencing or Registration

Geosciences are one of only a handful of fields of professional practice in Australia where some form of professional registration is not either mandated by government, or effectively essential due to industry imposed requirements (Waltho 2012).

The Professional Issues Subcommittee is concerned that regulation could be imposed on us, as illustrated by recently proposed Commonwealth legislation for Financial Advisors.  The Commonwealth government has released an exposure draft of legislation to raise education, training and ethical standards for Financial Advisers, including a Tertiary degree, an entrance exam, mandatory CPD and an enforceable Code of Ethics for public comment and consultation.  Geoscience could be considered to have escaped the attention of government regulators due to the limited exposure of the community to the actions of geoscience professionals.  This could, however, change rapidly should there be a scandal relating to the share price of an exploration or mining company that could, for example, have wide reaching consequences for both direct and indirect investors.  Many Australian’s superannuation investments have exposure to mining shares.

A number of Australian professional institutes are accredited through the Professional Standards Council (PSC) and regulated through State Professional Practice Acts. Information about this organisation is provided at http://www.psc.gov.au/

This accreditation provides limitations on the liabilities of an organisation and its members, and ensures that organisational self-regulation meets the current Australian standards applicable to other comparable professional organisations (such as Engineers Australia).

Accreditation of AIG by the PSC would require AIG to undertake the following (some of which are already within the scope of current activities):

  1. Both provide and track Continued Professional Development by members
  2. Maintain an effective complaints handling and disciplinary process for members
  3. Use of the PSC disclosure statement
  4. Undertake an annual risk management program review
  5. Improvements and changes to professional standards
  6. Insurance cover, claims and business asset monitoring
  7. Annual audit of members and the provision of an independent certificate

Additionally there is a cost for PSC membership including a one-time fee of $35,000 and an annual levy equivalent to $50 per AIG member.

Should AIG investigate accreditation and regulation through State Professional Practice Acts?

Paid Executive

AIG has experienced steady growth over the past 15 years with fee-paying Members doubling to about 2500. AIG’s management, however, continues to be managed by volunteer members with outsourced administrative (back office) support engaged on a contract basis. The Institute has no paid employees. If the above changes are approved, it is proposed that AIG will need to employ appropriately skilled and experienced staff to manage increased requirements for Membership, raising awareness of AIG’s activities and requirements of membership to universities, employers and regulators that will exceed reasonable expectations of volunteers.

The survey has only 9 questions and should take only about 10 minutes to complete.  Please consider your responses – your opinions are important to us.

References

AIG JORC Representatives (2015) – Strengthening the integrity of Public Reports made under the JORC Code– a confidential green paper prepared for the Australian Institute of Geoscientists

Coombes, J. (2016) Scoping Study Review – Discussion Paper presented to JORC

JORC (2012). The Australasian Code for Reporting of Exploration Results, Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves, from http://www.jorc.org/jorc_code.asp

Waltho, A. W. (2012) It’s Time to Think About Professional Registration, from https://www.aig.org.au/its-time-to-think-about-professional-registration/
[1] To date, professional experience has been assigned greater weighting than education in assessing competence.  We cannot, however, rely on the status quo continuing in view of developments overseas.