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16th SGA Biennial Meeting 2021 , Rotorua New Zealand

The 16th Biennial Meeting of the Society for Geology Applied to Mineral Deposits (SGA) will take place 15-18 November 2021 in Rotorua, New Zealand. 

The meeting will feature presentations on topics related to mineral deposit research, exploration, sustainable development and environmental and social aspects related to mineral deposits. The oral and poster presentation sessions, and pre- and post-conference short courses and field trips will provide a comprehensive programme.

The conference is organised by SGA with support from professionals in universities, research organisations, government, minerals industry, and service providers.

AIG is a supporter of the conference. AIG members may register for the SGA 2021 conference at the SGA member rate, a significant reduction in the conference registration fee.

Important Dates

  •  2 November 2020 – Call for Abstracts
  • 12 April 2021 – Online registration open
  • 3 May 2021 – Deadline for abstract submission
  • 1 September 2021 – Deadline for early bird registration
  • 15 November 2021 – 16th SGA Biennial Meeting

Visit the conference website for full details of the conference, to sign up for conference updates, explore sponsorship and exhibition opportunities and download a copy of the first circular.

   

   

Edumine Changes

AIG members have benefited from access to a dedicated Edumine campus for the past ten years. This will change in December when Edumine rolls out a new website and service delivery model.

At the moment, access to the Edumine campus requires payment of a subscription fee that offers full access to Edumine’s catalogue of self-paced, on-line courses and discounted access to live, on-line courses. From December, AIG’s relationship with Edumine will transition to one where every AIG member will receive an automatic, significant discount on the fees for every Edumine course. AIG Campus subscribers will continue to receive the full benefit of their subscription until 31st May 2020, when the campus will be discontinued.

Both on-line content delivery and the courses themselves are being updated and revamped to improve the quality of Edumine’s services.

At the moment, access to the Edumine campus by AIG members requires payment of a subscription fee that offers full access to Edumine’s catalogue of self-paced, on-line courses and discounted access to live, on-line courses. From December, AIG’s relationship with Edumine will transition to one where every AIG member will receive an automatic, significant discount on the fees for every Edumine course. Student members have not had access to the Edumine campus previously. From December, Student members will be able to access the course discounts. AIG Campus subscribers will continue to receive the full benefit of their subscription until 31st May 2020, when the campus will be discontinued.

Edumine is a great resource for AIG members seeking to expand their knowledge and exposure to geoscientific techniques and methods relevant to exploration and mining. The self-paced on-line courses are considered to be of particular benefit to AIG’s international members, and members working commute rosters by providing training that can be completed at any time, anywhere with Internet access. Every Edumine course completed by members will receive both Edumine continuing education units (CEU) and AIG continuous professional development (CPD) hours. Selected Edumine courses may also entitle members to credit towards formal qualifications in mining offered by several universities.

The AIG website team are currently working with Edumine to provide enhanced information regarding Edumine courses for AIG members.

Watch the AIOG website for further information.

Exploring a career in the minerals industry

The Geological Society of America (GSA), the American Geosciences Institute (AGI), the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and the Society of Economic Geology will be hosting a webinar entitled Exploring a Career in the Minerals Industry. The webinar will be on Wednesday, 21 August 2019, at 11:00 a.m. MDT. This webinar will feature two presenters from Newmont Goldcorp who will provide perspectives of a senior project manager and a student near graduation on what a geologist does in this important sector and what it takes to work within this industry.

AIG members have been invited to participate in the webinar, one of a series covering different aspects of geoscientific employment.

Date and Time: 21 August 2019 at 11:00 a.m. MDT
22 August 2019 at 3:00 am Brisbane, 1:00 am Perth
Cost: FREE
Duration: 1 hour
Click here to Register  

The webinar will be recorded and made available to registrants.

About the Webinar
Mineral resources are essential for the world, from precious metals such as gold and their relationship to the global economy, base metals & rare earth minerals and their use in electronics through to industrial minerals used in creation of steel and other construction materials used in our everyday lives. In the past century these non-renewable resources have become both more readily mined and technically challenging to reach. This webinar will feature the perspectives of a senior project manager and a student near graduation on what a geologist does in this important sector and what it takes to work within this industry.

Geologists in the hard-rock sector are engaged in the discovery of metals & minerals as well as their interpretation and potential extraction. The mine development cycle creates opportunities for geoscientists in exploration, modelling, environmental, geotechnical, and production teams. Geoscientists in this field can work either for contracting and consulting firms or directly for corporations ranging in size from junior explorers to multi-national mining firms. Opportunities can include working in remote locations in the field and/or undertaking interpretation from regional centers. This often involves being part of a cross-functional team. As with any industry, demand fluctuates with the market, but skilled workers are always needed, and a good mining company invests in developing safe, long-term projects. Exploration and mining geologists work to fulfill the world’s mineral needs with integrity, expertise, and safety while facilitating community involvement, job creation, and transparency.

About the Presenters
Terry Briggs is part of a Regional Leadership Team currently supporting the South America region of Newmont Goldcorp with operations in Peru, Argentina, and Suriname as well as projects and joint ventures across the region. Previous roles at corporate in Newmont Goldcorp included leading the Geology Function within the Global Technical Services Group as well as running due diligence activities of assets for potential M&A within Corporate Development. Prior to joining Newmont, he worked at a variety of base and precious metal, open pit and underground operations in Australia, Eastern Europe, and South East Asia in both geological and operations management roles. He holds a master’s in Engineering (management) from the University of Colorado and a bachelor of science (specializing in economic geology) from Monash University.

About the Presenters
Terry Briggs is part of a Regional Leadership Team currently supporting the South America region of Newmont Goldcorp with operations in Peru, Argentina, and Suriname as well as projects and joint ventures across the region. Previous roles at corporate in Newmont Goldcorp included leading the Geology Function within the Global Technical Services Group as well as running due diligence activities of assets for potential M&A within Corporate Development. Prior to joining Newmont, he worked at a variety of base and precious metal, open pit and underground operations in Australia, Eastern Europe, and South East Asia in both geological and operations management roles. He holds a master’s in Engineering (management) from the University of Colorado and a bachelor of science (specializing in economic geology) from Monash University.

Elaine Lord holds a bachelor’s of science (hard rock emphasis) from Northern Illinois University, is pursuing a MSc. degree at the University of Alberta, and is currently interning at Newmont Goldcorp as a resource modeler. She has been part of the geological community since her childhood and has studied fossils, paleo-ecology, and resource modeling. Elaine has held positions ranging from GeoCorps park geologist intern to fossil preparator intern at the Field Museum, but has settled into mineral production geosciences as a career choice.

30 Things

30 Things, released recently by the Minerals Council of Australia, focusses on the science of materials, materials that mineral and energy explorers, resources developers and miners and petroleum producers find, extract and create for the economies, nations and people of the world.

30 Things is a great resource for pointing out the contribution of minerals and metals to everyday life – things we take for granted like:

  • electricity
  • iPads, smartphones and X-boxes
  • your home
  • beer
  • wind generators and solar panels
  • even the Melbourne Cup.

Download 30 Things in PDF format from the Minerals Council of Australia website.

Geoscientist unemployment essentially unchanged

The latest Australian geoscientist employment survey results show little change in unemployment and underemployment amongst Australian geoscientists in Quarter 3 from Quarter 2, 2018.

Geoscientist unemployment in Australia during the third quarter of 2018 was little changed from the previous quarter.  The unemployment rate fell from 8.5% at the end of June to 8.3% at the end of September.  Under-employment amongst self employed geoscientists also fell slightly, from 13.2% to 12.9% for the same period.

Geoscientist unemployment in Australia June 2009 to September 2018
Geoscientist unemployment in Australia June 2009 to September 2018.

Almost half (43%) of respondents reporting that they were under-employed said that they were achieving less than 25% of their desired level of self- employment, pointing to real unemployment and under-employment rates of 13.8% and 7.4% for the September quarter of 2018 respectively.

The survey results are interpreted to reflect anecdotal evidence of continued improvement in geoscientist employment in Australia throughout 2018, but the pace of improvement has been slow. 

“Employment conditions for geoscientists in Australia are showing very welcome, gradual employment but the rate at which this improvement is happening remains slow” AIG spokesperson Andrew Waltho said.  

State by state, unemployment fell in Western Australia and Queensland.  A small increase in unemployment was observed in NSW and the ACT, but significant increases in unemployment were evident in Victoria, where unemployment increased by almost 11%, followed by South Australia at over 9%.

Western Australia and Queensland unemployment June 2009 to Sep 2018
Western Australia and Queensland unemployment June 2009 to Sep 2018

“In the latest survey, 23% of unemployed and underemployed respondents lost employment during the past three months”.  “This was only slightly exceeded by the number of respondents re-entering the workforce” Mr Waltho said.  “A significant number of geoscientists appear to be caught in an employment revolving door” Mr Waltho said.

The proportion of geoscientists employed in mineral exploration during the September quarter increased, from 65.3% to 66.1% during the quarter; the highest contribution proportion of survey respondents engaged in mineral exploration of 66.9% recorded by these surveys in September 2012, suggesting that increased mineral exploration in Australia is making a difference, but at the expense of other fields of practice.  Little change was evident in employment in metalliferous mining and energy resource exploration and production.

The proportion of unemployed and underemployed geoscientists looking to leave their profession fell sharply from 4,2% at the end of June, to 2.6% at the end of September. 

“The decline in geoscientists looking to leave their profession must be seen as a positive sign” Mr Waltho said.  “These results are markedly down from the peak of 11.4% of unemployed and under-employed geoscientists looking to leave their profession recorded in December 2016” Mr Waltho said.

The proportion of geoscientists in full-time employment in the latest survey was 68.6%, well below the peak of 83.9% recorded in June 2014.  Part time employment provided 3.3% of jobs.  Some 28.1% of respondents identified as being self employed; up from 21.9% in the previous quarter and the low of 13.0% recorded in June 2013.  

“We have clearly seen a trend towards engagement of self-employed geoscientists as consultants and contractors by exploration and mining companies over the past four to five years” Mr Waltho said.  “This is reflected in data for employment and unemployment by years of experience, which points to almost half of unemployed geoscientists being the most experienced component of the workforce” Mr Waltho said.  

Geoscientist employment and and unemployment by years of experience.
Geoscientist employment and and unemployment by years of experience.

“Early career geoscientists are also experiencing difficulties getting started in the profession” Mr Waltho said.  “AIG is strongly focused on this issue with AIG’s National Graduate Committee working hard to improve opportunities for early career geoscientists through initiatives that, notably, include the Institute’s extremely successful mentoring programme” Mr Waltho said.

The next survey will open for contributions on 1 January 2019.

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